Lyrics

Lucky Dube – Victims Lyrics

“Lucky Dube – Victims” is a reggae song by South African reggae musician and songwriter, Lucky Dube. It was released as part of his album “Victims” in 1993. The song addresses the issue of social injustice and the plight of the oppressed in society. The lyrics highlight the struggles and suffering of the victims of injustice, calling for equality, freedom, and compassion.

The song starts with the lines “The first time I saw you, you were standing in the rain / You were waiting at the station for the last connecting train / Well, who will you sleep with tonight? / Will you walk the street alone tomorrow?” These lines set the tone for the song, depicting a person who is vulnerable, alone, and facing hardship.

The chorus of the song goes, “Victims, we’re not the same / We get to choose who to blame / We are victims, victims of the system.” These lines reflect the theme of the song, which is about how people become victims of a system that perpetuates injustice and inequality. The lyrics suggest that victims are not all the same, and they have the power to choose who to blame for their situation, indicating that the system and those who perpetuate it are responsible for the suffering of the victims.

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The lyrics also highlight the impact of social and economic inequality, with lines such as “Some are walking barefoot, some are talking top shoes / Some are sleeping on an empty bed, some are sleeping in a bed too big.” These lines depict the disparities and inequities in society, where some people struggle with poverty and lack of basic necessities, while others enjoy excess and luxury.

The song also addresses issues of discrimination and prejudice, with lines like “Some are beaten up, and some are kicked around / Some are spit upon, and some are treated just like clowns.” These lines draw attention to the mistreatment and abuse that victims of discrimination and prejudice face, emphasizing the need for equality and respect for all individuals.

Throughout the song, Lucky Dube’s powerful vocals and the reggae rhythm create a sense of urgency and emotion, conveying the pain, suffering, and resilience of the victims. The lyrics of “Victims” are a call for social justice, empathy, and compassion, urging listeners to recognize the injustices in society and take action to create a more equitable world.

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Here are the full lyrics for “Victims” by Lucky Dube:

The first time I saw you, you were standing in the rain
You were waiting at the station for the last connecting train
Well, who will you sleep with tonight?
Will you walk the street alone tomorrow?

Victims, we’re not the same
We get to choose who to blame
We are victims, victims of the system

Some are walking barefoot, some are talking top shoes
Some are sleeping on an empty bed, some are sleeping in a bed too big
Well, who will you turn to when it’s time to turn the lights off?
Who’s gonna take you seriously when you knock on the door?

Victims, we’re not the same
We get to choose who to blame
We are victims, victims of the system

Some are beaten up, and some are kicked around
Some are spit upon, and some are treated just like clowns
Well, there’s a short man looking for a big man
There’s a poor man looking for a handout

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Victims, we’re not the same
We get to choose who to blame
We are victims, victims of the system

Victims, we’re not the same
We get to choose who to blame
We are victims, victims of the system

Well, there’s a cripple looking for someone to carry him
There’s a sick man looking for someone to take care of him
There’s a hungry man, reaching out for someone to feed him
There’s a homeless man, reaching out for someone to shelter him

Victims, we’re not the same
We get to choose who to blame
We are victims, victims of the system

Victims, we’re not the same
We get to choose who to blame
We are victims, victims of the system

The lyrics of “Victims” by Lucky Dube convey a powerful message about the plight of the oppressed, the impact of social inequality, and the need for social justice and compassion in society. The song remains a poignant reminder of the challenges faced by marginalized communities and continues to resonate with listeners around the world.

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